Wheelchair Basketball FAQs & Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

Is the sport of wheelchair basketball currently offered as a sanctioned interscholastic sport and if so, where?

Yes, wheelchair basketball is a sanctioned interscholastic sport in Georgia. Participating school district teams compete in regular and post season competition utilizing standardized rules of play in both varsity and junior varsity divisions

I don’t use a wheelchair for daily mobility, can I still play?

YES. You do not have to use a wheelchair for everyday mobility to play wheelchair basketball. Any permanent lower extremity disability qualifies a person to play wheelchair basketball.

How high is the basket?

The standard height of the basket for wheelchair basketball is ten feet.  As with all sports, the field of play and equipment can be altered to provide appropriate opportunities based on the age and physical maturity/ability of the student.  The standard modified height for the basket in these cases is 8.5 feet.

What balls does the team use?

The standard basketball used is a men’s regulation ball.  As with all sports, the equipment can be altered to provide appropriate opportunities based on the age and physical maturity/ability of the student.  Two options exists for students who are not yet ready for a regulation size men’s ball.  First is a regulation women’s ball and second is a Spalding NBA Rookie Gear Composite Basketball that is smaller and lighter than a women’s ball.  Both options offer an excellent opportunity for a student who is not yet ready for a men’s ball to learn proper fundamentals with an appropriately sized ball.

How does a player dribble and push the chair at the same time?

The traveling rule is modified such that a player is allowed two pushes for every dribble. The ball may be placed in the player’s lap between dribbles. A player may stop and start their dribble at any time as there is no double dribble violation in wheelchair basketball.

It can get crowded in the lane, can you trap offensive players in the lane in order to get a 3 second call?

NO. While you may trap offensive players in the lane, as long as they are attempting to leave the lane the 3 second call will stop. However, if once the call is stopped and the player attempting to leave the lane becomes an offensive threat by calling for a pass, it will be an immediate violation.

Resources

American Association of Adapted Sports Programs Wheelchair Track Video

Organizations:
National Wheelchair Basketball Association (NWBA)
American Association of Adapted Sports Programs (AAASP)
International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF)

Suppliers:
Top End
Quickie
Per4Max
Colours
Eagle Sports Chairs
Xcalibur

 

Guideline Table of Contents
Overview
Training and Equipment 
Rules
Groupings and Safety
Glossary
Safety